Our Vision

A free and fair society where we nurture people and planet.

Our Mission

To achieve this, we deliver campaigning journalism that informs and empowers people to change their world.

Our Values

The Canary is progressive, open and rigorous. We work with respect, courage and generosity.

 

What is The Canary ?

The Canary is an independent non-profit news website co-founded by Kerry-anne Mendoza, our Editor-in-Chief, in October 2015. With absolutely no financial backing or outside investment, we have rapidly built a brand new media outlet from scratch through determination in our progressive values, a vibrant team and engaging content.

In the two months leading up to the last general election, The Canary was read by over 8.7 million people – a wider online reach than The Times.

We remain completely independent of any advertisers, funders, companies, political organisations, or political parties.

We produce high-quality, well-researched and incisive journalism that holds power to account. Our content focuses on news, ideas and key developments that impact democracy, equality, freedom and fairness.

Today, a handful of powerful moguls controls our mainstream media. As such, its coverage is largely conservative. But we have created a truly independent and viable alternative. One that isn’t afraid to challenge the status quo, to ask the hard questions, and to have an opinion. This has only been possible because of the amazing support from you – our readers.

Who owns and runs The Canary?

See our full team here.

The Canary is the sole website run by Canary Media Limited. This private limited company is registered in England with registration number 09788095. You can view our public accounts and directors at Companies House.

Canary Media Limited is owned entirely by its leadership team, comprising of: four directors (Kerry-anne Mendoza – Editor-in-Chief, Drew Rose – Managing Director, Nancy Mendoza – Director of Comms and Membership, Bex Sumner – Standards Editor), four Editors (John Ranson, Emily Apple, Ed Sykes, Tracy Keeling) and Andrew Streets, our Head of Advertising.

Andrew Butler, our Operations Manager, also supports the leadership team, as do weekend editors Fréa Lockley and Peadar O’Cearnaigh.

Around 10 part-time staff writers (some of them also editors) write for the site, along with a few freelance contributors and guest writers. We put out almost 12 articles a day on average.

How can I trust what I read in The Canary?

In April 2019, The Canary became one of the first UK media outlets to be awarded a green trust mark for news credibility and transparency from monitoring and rating site Newsguard. You can read their in-depth report on us by installing the Newsguard extension then navigating back to our site.

Media Bias / Fact Check has also reviewed our website. It states that, “we rate The Canary Left biased based on story selection that typically favors the left and High for factual reporting due to proper sourcing and a clean fact check record.”

Each article goes through a rigorous editorial process in which it is checked and amended by at least two editors (a section editor and a copy editor). Complex investigations are edited by at least three, including an investigations editor.

Unlike the mainstream press, which regulates itself, we are regulated by IMPRESS, the only independent press regulator in the UK. IMPRESS is the only regulator to be recognised by the UK government’s Press Recognition Panel.

We adhere to the high journalistic standards set out in the IMPRESS Standards Code and are held to account if we ever fail to do so. The code covers such areas as accuracy, attribution, children, discrimination, harassment, justice, privacy, sources, suicide and transparency.

We also have our own Code of Practice, which lays out the standards and ethical principles that guide our writers and editors whenever we make journalistic decisions.

The Canary strives to report the news accurately, responsibly and with humanity. If we make a mistake, we rely on our readers to help us maintain our high standards.

If you spot an error in any of our articles or you think we may have broken the standards set out in the code please see our corrections and complaints policy for information about how to contact us, the complaints process and how we publish corrections.

We also support the NUJ’s Code of Conduct and actively encourage all of our journalists to join and be active in the National Union of Journalists.

For more information on our ethics and editorial standards, please read our Code of Practice.

Where does the money come from and where does it go?

In August 2019, The Canary became primarily a reader-supported media platform. The remainder of our income comes from online advertising.

Also in August 2019, we moved all of our editors and staff writers onto hourly shifts and annual contracts (with holiday, sick pay and pension options). All of our staff are paid over the living wage.

We don’t have fancy offices – in fact, we don’t have any offices! This ensures that the vast majority of our income goes directly to our team as wages. We also commission guest posts and video content from independent producers.

How To Support Us

Please become a supporter. By providing us with a small contribution each month, you are directly supporting independent campaigning journalism. In return, you’ll get an ad-free reading experience and a monthly behind the scenes newsletter.

Much of our growth comes from word of mouth and social sharing. By spreading the word about The Canary (by liking, commenting and engaging in the community), you help make us sustainable.

The Future

We will be expanding our media output in 2019 by producing regular video interviews, news reports, and podcasts.

Democratising media creation is a central aim of The Canary. We will be developing our membership platform that allows our readers to decide on the areas we investigate. You will have a say in the media you see.

We will also channel revenue into an Investigative Journalism Fund. This will enable the kind of long-form, original, and investigative journalism that has become a rarity in the cash-strapped mainstream.