Netanyahu wants his new government to annex illegal settlements in occupied West Bank

Ed Sykes

Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu has finally sworn in his new government, following three deadlocked and divisive elections, a year-and-a-half of political paralysis, and another three-day delay because of political infighting in Netanyahu’s Likud party. On 17 May, Israel’s parliament passed a vote of confidence in Netanyahu’s new administration to end over 500 days of upheaval.

According to Al-Jazeera, Netanyahu had called before the confidence vote for the annexation of illegal settlements in the occupied West Bank, saying:

It’s time to apply the Israeli law and write another glorious chapter in the history of Zionism

Donald Trump’s deal with Israel at the start of this year had already given these annexation plans the green light. The deal met with widespread opposition from within occupied Palestine and further afield.

The Netanyahu-Gantz deal, and ongoing corruption probe

Over the weekend, both Netanyahu and his rival-turned-partner Benny Gantz announced their appointments for the new government. Netanyahu and former military chief Gantz announced last month that they would join forces to steer the country through the coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis and its severe economic fallout, with unemployment currently standing at around 25%.

Their controversial powersharing deal calls for Netanyahu to serve as prime minister for the government’s first 18 months before being replaced by Gantz for the next 18 months. Their blocs will also have a similar number of ministers and mutual veto power over most major decisions.

Netanyahu, meanwhile, has been indicted on corruption charges. He faces a criminal trial starting next week.

Featured image and additional content via Press Association

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  • Show Comments
    1. I appreciate the symbolism of annexation and how it shines a light on the inadequacies of the EU, the sheer wickedness of the US (and not just Trump) while enabling our friends in the British Board of Deputies to demonstrate that it has become just another White Supremacist group; one with a firm grip over the remnants of a castrated Labour Party..
      However, I’m tempted to ask so what? The West Bank was annexed in practice decades ago. Even in the supposed capital , Ramallah, no one is safe from the Border Police and the IDF. When a raid is due, the PA’s quisling forces are told to stand down; which,understandably, they do to avoid massacre.
      In fact, no Palestinian is safe anywhere. Everywhere is under Zionist control, even Gaza, where the threat there comes the skies rather than deranged settler youths and callow IDF conscripts.
      Once it happens- and it will happen- let us throw the “Two-State” illusion in the bin; demand voter rights and human rights for the indigenous population. The aim should be a single state, multi-ethnic, secular and democratic, with the exiled Palestinians allowed home. And I realise that it will be neither easy nor popular in Israel and among its proxies but the two-state illusion was always that; a mirage. The Zionists have always been clear as to what they want; we in the west have been too cowardly to recognise it.

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