People trapped as floodwater surges through streets after river bursts banks

The Canary

A helicopter has been brought in to help people trapped in houses on the Isle of Man as a river burst its banks causing “horrendous conditions”.

A Coastguard helicopter was pictured over the village of Laxey, on the east coast of the island, as floodwater from the Laxey River surged through the streets, leading to police declaring a “major incident”.

The new storms come as parts of the north of England and the Midlands continue to cope with flash flooding following days of heavy rain.

Further heavy rain is forecast for later in the week when the remnants of Hurricane Lorenzo sweep across the UK.

Local police on the Isle of Man said on Facebook: “Glen Road between the upper and lower bridges has flooded severely. Several vehicles have washed away. Persons are trapped in at least three houses.

“Fire Rescue and Coastguard are on scene with fast water rescue teams.

“A major incident has been declared with all Govt agencies helping out.

“We are asking that any persons trapped go up stairs and monitor media.”

Flooding at Laxey Harbour, Isle of Man
Flooding at Laxey Harbour, Isle of Man (Ed Hutton/Twitter/PA)

The village, which is about four miles north of the capital Douglas, appeared to be worst hit, although police also reported problems on the coast road and in Onchan as well as a landslip on the mountain road.

The force said: “While we assess the full impact of the rain and flooding, we suggest that all non-urgent travel is avoided.”

One witness, Julie Graham, said on Twitter: “Coastguard helicopter on Laxey football pitch. Horrendous conditions, river has burst its banks, people trapped in their houses.

“The emergency services are doing an amazing job.”

The flooding on the Isle of Man came as the Met Office issued warnings of further heavy rain and thunderstorms across England and Wales.

We need your help ...

The coronavirus pandemic is changing our world, fast. And we will do all we can to keep bringing you news and analysis throughout. But we are worried about maintaining enough income to pay our staff and minimal overheads.

Now, more than ever, we need a vibrant, independent media that holds the government to account and calls it out when it puts vested economic interests above human lives. We need a media that shows solidarity with the people most affected by the crisis – and one that can help to build a world based on collaboration and compassion.

We have been fighting against an establishment that is trying to shut us down. And like most independent media, we don’t have the deep pockets of investors to call on to bail us out.

Can you help by chipping in a few pounds each month?

The Canary Support us