More refugees rescued after trying to seek safety across the Channel

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Another group of refugees is thought to have been rescued off the Kent coast as the wave of people trying to cross the Channel from France in small boats continues.

On Monday morning, a group of people draped in blankets were seen being brought ashore at the Port of Dover by Border Force officials.

The group – thought to number 12 and mostly men with at least one woman – were searched, handed over to immigration officials and taken away in a van after coming ashore at around 11am.

Migrant Channel crossing incidents
A group of people thought to be refugees brought to shore by Border Force officers at the Port of Dover in Kent on Monday (Gareth Fuller/PA)

The French coastguard said it rescued nine people – six men, a woman and two children – shortly after 5am when the engine on their boat failed. They were taken to Boulogne-sur-Mer and handed over to police at around 8.15am, the Prefet Maritime Manche, who overseas Channel operations for the French, said.

At around 4.30am, Border Force was alerted to another small boat crossing the Channel with eight men, a woman and two children – who said they were Iraqi and Iranian – found on board, the Home Office said.

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The crossings continued on Monday after a wave of refugee camp clearances in France last week.

Migrant Channel crossing incidents
The group was searched and taken away in vans (Gareth Fuller/PA)

On Sunday, 41 people in four craft were caught heading for UK shores amid sunny weather and relatively calm sea conditions.

Two men, who said they were an Iranian and an Afghan, were picked up after attempting the perilous voyage in a kayak, the Home Office said.

A boat carrying 24 refugees – two of whom were children – was intercepted, with another vessel carrying five men and a woman also found.

A third boat, carrying seven men and two women, was also found.

Those rescued said they were Iranian, Afghan, Turkish and Malian.

All were handed over to immigration officials.

This comes days after Border Force intercepted what is thought to be the highest number of refugees and asylum seekers in a single day amid warnings the closure of a French camp could prompt a spike in Channel crossings.

At least 86 men, women and children attempted the journey in small boats on September 10, with some managing to land on beaches before being detained.

Charities have warned the imminent closure of a gym in Dunkirk, where up to 1,000 refugees are living including more than 70 families with young children, is likely to prompt a spike in crossing attempts.

On Friday, French police officers – including some who appeared to be armed with tear gas guns – cordoned off a road by an area of wasteland and woodland on the outskirts of Calais, telling those camping there to leave and move their tents.

That same day the National Crime Agency said six people suspected of being part of organised crime groups smuggling migrants across the Channel in lorries and small boats had been arrested that week.

Border Force cutters are continuing to patrol the Channel while drones, CCTV and night vision goggles are used, the Home Office said.

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