Israel’s deadliest single attack kills dozens of people in Gaza

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Israeli air strikes in the heart of Gaza City have flattened three buildings and killed at least 26 people. This makes it the deadliest single attack since Israel began attacks on Gaza nearly a week ago.

The Gaza health ministry said 10 women and eight children were among those killed in Sunday’s attack, with another 50 people injured. Rescuers raced to pull survivors and bodies from the rubble following the assault.

Israel bombing before peace talks

Earlier, Israel claims it had bombed the home of Gaza’s top Hamas leader in a separate strike. It was the third such air attack targeting the homes of Hamas leaders in the last two days.

Israel appears to have stepped up its deadly air strikes in recent days. These attacks come as efforts to broker a ceasefire accelerate with the arrival of a US diplomat in the region and talks at the UN Security Council.

The military said it struck the homes of Yehiyeh Sinwar, the most senior Hamas leader inside the territory, and his brother Muhammad, another senior Hamas member. On Saturday it destroyed the home of Khalil al-Hayeh, a senior figure in Hamas’s political branch.

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Brigadier general Hidai Zilberman confirmed the strike on Sinwar’s house in the southern Gaza town of Khan Younis to army radio. He said the home of his brother, who is in charge of Hamas “logistics and personnel”, was also destroyed.

Media building destroyed
The building housing the offices of The Associated Press and other media in Gaza City collapsed after it was hit by an Israeli air strike on Saturday (Hatem Moussa/AP)

The human cost of Israel’s air strikes

Hamas and the Islamic Jihad group have acknowledged 20 fighters have been killed since the fighting broke out last Monday. And at least 174 Palestinians have been killed in Gaza, including 47 children and 29 women, with more than 1,200 injured. Eight Israelis have been killed, including a five-year-old boy and a soldier.

Hamas and other groups have fired some 2,900 rockets into Israel since Monday. This came as a result of Israeli police storming the al-Asqa mosque and using tear gas and rubber bullets on Palestinian worshippers. Additionally Israel threatened to evict dozens of Palestinian families from a nearby neighbourhood.

Israel has carried out hundreds of air strikes across the impoverished and blockaded territory, which is home to more than two million Palestinians, and brought down a number of high-rise buildings – including one that housed the Associated Press office in Gaza.

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    1. I believe that supposedly civilized society should be careful not to self-righteously look down its nose to condemn the evil acts of one racial, ethnic, religious, cultural group or another. I once heard a philosophy professor say that every person should avoid believing (let alone saying) that they, as a human being, are not inherently predisposed to committing an atrocity if pushed to their limit. Contrary to what is claimed or felt by many of us, he said, deep down there’s a tyrant in each of us that, under the right circumstances, can be unleashed.

      Meanwhile, though some identifiable groups have been brutally victimized throughout history a disproportionately large number of times, the victims of one place and time can and sometimes do become the victimizers of another. I’m not one who holds much faith in the Bible, but I still give credence to the claim within (a verse somewhere stating) that base human nature is indeed “desperately wicked”. And maybe even more so when convinced that ‘God is on my/our side!’.

      As an international news consumer since the late-1980s, I’ve found in this callous world that a very large number of people, however precious their lives, can be considered disposable to a nation. And when the young children of those people take notice of this, tragically, they’re vulnerable to begin perceiving themselves as worthless. When I say this, I primarily have in mind Black and indigenous-nation Americans (and Canadians, though perhaps to a lesser degree).
      However, while their devaluation as human beings is basically based on their race, it reminds me of the devaluation, albeit perhaps subconsciously, of the daily civilian lives lost (a.k.a. “casualties”) in protractedly devastating war zones and sieges. At some point, they can end up receiving a meagre couple of column inches in the First World’s daily news.

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