People are genuinely shocked by a Guardian description of ordinary people at the royal wedding

Prince Harry waving for the camera royal wedding
James Wright

The Guardian published a headline that characterised ordinary people who will attend the royal wedding as “commoners”. This is how people responded:

“Patronising term”

The full headline reads:

On social media, many expressed surprise at the choice of words:

https://twitter.com/MarkSmithWriter/status/969594655955406848

The Guardian went on to gush over the benefits for the “commoners”:

The commoners, 1,200 of whom will be chosen “from every corner of the United Kingdom”, will get to watch the arrival of the bride and groom as well as their wedding guests, and then the carriage procession as it leaves after the service.

Social media users mocked it accordingly:

For the record, the original press release from Kensington Palace did not refer to the public as ‘commoners’.

“Widely used term”

Responding to The Canary, a Guardian News and Media Ltd spokesperson claimed:

‘Commoner’ is a widely used term when reporting on royalty

Slavery, fascism, and smallpox were also once widespread. That doesn’t make them ideal. This is frankly a terrible line of defence from The Guardian – an outlet that prides itself as a leading left-liberal voice. The term ‘commoner’ was regressive in the 18th century, and it’s regressive now.

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Featured image via Surtsicna – Wikimedia

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