A list of the 40+ NHS heroes who’ve died so far in the fight against coronavirus

The Canary

More than 40 NHS staff members have now reportedly died during the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak in the UK.

The government has confirmed 19 deaths among those working for the health service, but announcements from NHS trusts and tributes from loved ones indicate the true number is higher still.

Latest victims

Specific tributes have been paid to a pregnant nurse who died after contracting coronavirus. Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong, 28, worked as a nurse on a general ward at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital for five years. She died on Sunday. Her baby girl was delivered successfully and is doing well, according to the Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

An associate specialist in Reading, a ward housekeeper in north London, and a healthcare assistant in Bristol were among other victims to be identified in recent days.

Father-of-two Dr Peter Tun worked as an associate specialist in neurorehabilitation at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading for more than 21 years. The 62-year-old died in the hospital’s intensive care unit on Monday.

North Middlesex University Hospital, meanwhile, confirmed the death of ward housekeeper Cheryl Williams.

Grandmother Maureen Ellington, who was in her early 60s, worked at Southmead Hospital in Bristol as a healthcare assistant and passed away on 12 April. She had worked for the NHS for over 25 years at both Frenchay and Southmead hospitals.

The PA news agency has also confirmed the deaths of the following NHS workers:

  1. Josiane Zauma Ebonja Ekoli, agency nurse.
  2. Leilani Medel, agency nurse.
  3. Amarante Dias, hospital worker.
  4. Melujean Ballesteros, nurse.
  5. Kevin Smith, plaster technician.
  6. Oscar King Jr, hospital porter.
  7. Elbert Rico, hospital porter.
  8. Gareth Roberts, nurse.
  9. Donna Campbell, healthcare support worker.
  10. Sara Dee Trollope, nurse.
  11. Julie Omar, nurse.
  12. Amor Gatinao, nurse.
  13. Aimee O’Rourke, nurse.
  14. Dr Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, consultant urologist.
  15. Dr Edmond Adedeji, doctor.
  16. Fayez Ayache, GP.
  17. Elsie Sazuze, care home nurse.
  18. Leilani Dayrit, nurse.
  19. Donald Suelto, nurse.
  20. Alice Kit Tak Ong, nurse.
  21. Janice Graham, nurse.
  22. Syed Haider, GP.
  23. Barbara Moore, patient discharge planner.
  24. Dr Alfa Saadu, doctor.
  25. Jitendra Rathod, surgeon.
  26. Lynsay Coventry, midwife.
  27. Emily Perugia, care worker.
  28. Glen Corbin, nurse.
  29. Rebecca Mack, nurse.
  30. Liz Glanister, nurse.
  31. John Alagos, nurse.
  32. Areema Nasreen, nurse.
  33. Sami Shousha, researcher.
  34. Thomas Harvey, nurse.
  35. Dr Amged El-Hawrani, consultant.
  36. Pooja Sharma, pharmacist.
  37. Dr Habib Zaidi, GP.
  38. Dr Adil El Tayar, transplant surgeon.
  39. Dr Anton Sebastianpillai, consultant.

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  • Show Comments
    1. Indeed – heroes all as employed staff of an overarching ‘NHS employer’ which, in truth (the NHS as an employer) is failing lamentably across the board. And, it’s not the fault of hospital or surgery heroes. During the Coronavirus pandemic the entire NHS facility is taken up for one world-altering disease of suspect devastating emergence out of China (and possibly with USA connivance) yet to be determined with concise research certain guilt a particular or particular laboratories having historically toyed blithely and arrogantly with dangerous pathogens. Meanwhile, pretty much all other medical needs our NHS usually oversees have been suspended because the NHS as an employer and facilitator as well with what it usually, under duress already copes, is incapable of supplying sufficient needful efficacy because one pandemic disease of artful (possibly ‘artificial’) manufactured origin rampages the planet.

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