Climate activists blockade nuclear base with giant plant pots

The Canary

Climate activists have blockaded the Faslane nuclear base by attaching themselves to giant plant pots.

Members of Extinction Rebellion Scotland and Trident Ploughshares, are staging the blockade at the north gate of the base on the Gare Loch in Argyll and Bute.

The group placed three planters, which contain plants and flowers and are painted with the words “Safe”, “Green”, and “Future”, on the road on Friday morning.

A protester is locked on to each planter so they cannot be moved, preventing access to the base, though emergency vehicles can still access the site via the south gate.

The activists said they are demanding a future safe from the “threat of nuclear weapons and environmental destruction”.

Protest at Faslane
The activists are staging the protest at the north gate of the base (Extinction Rebellion Scotland/PA)

Sarah Krischer, an archaeologist and Extinction Rebellion (XR) Scotland activist, said: “Nuclear weapons are an existential threat to the entire world.

“Stockpiling weapons with the ability to wipe out all life in order to appear tough does nothing to keep either the UK or any other country safe.

“The ongoing environmental degradation caused by uranium mining and nuclear testing continues to be felt, particularly among Pacific island nations that are also the most threatened by climate change.

“We must come together to build a safe, more just future for all.”

Police Scotland said they are aware of the incident and officers are at the scene.

HM Naval Base Clyde, known as Faslane, is home to the UK’s nuclear deterrent.

Extinction Rebellion said the action is part of the Peace Lotus campaign, a global day of anti-war resistance celebrating the anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War.

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