Katie Hopkins took to Twitter for legal advice. It didn’t end well.

Katie Hopkins and Tommy Robinson
Emily Apple

Serial racist Katie Hopkins is at it again. By ‘it’, we mean making a complete and utter fool of herself.

This time, she decided to ask a legal professional a series of questions about ex-English Defence League (EDL) leader Tommy Robinson’s imprisonment.

But it didn’t end well for Hopkins, as she was owned by social media users.

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‘Please send help, I can’t read!’

‘The Secret Barrister’ has written an excellent and detailed account of Robinson’s arrest and imprisonment. But this wasn’t enough for Hopkins. So she tweeted to them:

Continue reading below...

But the Secret Barrister gave her short shrift:

And as others pointed out:

Don’t worry, Katie, help is on hand!

Luckily for Hopkins, there were other barristers on Twitter to set her straight:

Sometimes, you don’t even need a lawyer

But it wasn’t just legal professionals who were able to help her out:

If at first you don’t succeed…

Not satisfied with the wealth of legal knowledge Twitter provided, Hopkins took to Twitter again:

And again, it didn’t go well:

Too little, too late

If Hopkins genuinely wanted the answers to these questions, she probably would have thought to find them out before appearing on Fox News. Not our Katie, though, as social media users were quick to highlight:

https://twitter.com/Muscledita/status/1002196588368924672

Before issuing the tweet, she did an interview in which she claimed “these are very dark times in the UK”. She further stated:

In order to cleanse voices it doesn’t like, it will put them inside for as long as it needs to to shut them up.

Although it may have helped if she had asked for legal advice before tweeting. Because the Secret Barrister did give her one piece of advice:

The Canary has left out the links to Hopkins’ Fox appearance for legal reasons.

Some basic facts

Just for the avoidance of any doubt, here are some important facts.

Yes, there were temporary restrictions on the reporting of Robinson’s imprisonment. But these were related to the trial he was jeopardising, not his own imprisonment. And as The Canary previously reported:

  • Contempt of court laws exist to ensure defendants have a fair trial. As journalists, we respect this law as it means we do not prejudice the outcome of court cases.
  • Robinson was arrested for breach of the peace but ended up being sentenced for contempt of court. This is common practice. The police often arrest for one offence but pursue another once they and the Crown Prosecution Service have looked at the evidence.
  • Robinson pleaded guilty and was sentenced straight away. Again, this is common practice with a guilty plea, especially one that activates a suspended sentence.
  • He received legal advice and was represented. Although they can apply for “audience rights“, most solicitors cannot represent defendants at Crown Court. This is done by barristers. There is no such thing as a “prosecution barrister” for a defendant.

Hopkins clearly doesn’t know what she’s talking about. But that hasn’t prevented her from spouting off on Fox News and furthering her career through ignorance. That said, however, there is something delicious about watching her get owned on Twitter.

Grab the popcorn.

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