Another unpopular politician advises Labour be more right-wing

Yawning men
Wilson Belshaw

The Guardian is still finding unpopular politicians to step forwards and tell Corbyn to change direction. The most recent was a policy adviser to the junior minister in New Labour’s short-lived Ministry of Pet Grooming. The former advisor claimed:

If Yvette Cooper was in charge, we’d have 250% of the vote – easy! She’s like diet Tony Blair, and people love diets, right?

Despite the Guardian giving this person their own daily column, no one seems to be paying attention. It’s almost like this constant chatter of politicos with no ideas beyond ‘get Corbyn’ has become little more than background noise.

Failing down

As Britain’s premier left-ish newspaper, the Guardian could have used the momentum of the Corbyn movement to reverse its failing fortunes. Instead, it’s opted to commission the same article about Corbyn every day for the past three years. But why?

A former Guardian editor told Off The Perch:

When Corbyn got into power, a man called us and claimed he’d planted a bomb in the Guardian offices. He said that unless we published 60 anti-Corbyn articles a week, he’d blow us all up. He claimed he wasn’t Tony Blair, but he sounded like he was, and he referred to himself as ‘Tony B’.

Hardship 

Of course, the real victims are the Guardian columnists who have to attack Corbyn’s moderate social programme. It must take a lot of energy to hit copy and paste every week. Hopefully someone more right-wing gets in soon so they can get back to pretending they’re at the forefront of progressive politics.

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Featured image via Wikimedia / pixabay [IMAGE WAS ALTERED]

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Wilson Belshaw