The Maybot isn’t fooling anyone. See the reaction to Theresa May’s dance at the Tory conference.

Theresa May at the 2018 Conservative Party Conference
Afroze Fatima Zaidi

At the Conservative Party conference, PM Theresa May made waves when she came on stage to deliver her speech. She did so by ‘dancing’ on the stage to the tune of ABBA’s Dancing Queen.

May’s supporters described the move as self-deprecating humour, and praised it for being bold and funny. Critics, however, are decidedly unimpressed:

People are also describing May’s awkward dancing as a PR stunt which distracts from real issues:

Brexit

Not least of these issues is Brexit. Especially since no one is particularly clear on what May’s plan is, least of all May herself:

Even some Tory supporters are unimpressed:

Windrush

And while May might think her ‘hostile environment’ policies have been forgotten, the internet never forgets. Especially with the Windrush scandal still fresh in people’s memory:

https://twitter.com/C_MorrittEsq/status/1047502748844019712

Austerity

Of course, austerity measures are also contributing to the outrage. In the face of deaths caused by austerity, May’s dance appears downright flippant:

From the reaction to the ‘Maybot’ – as the dance is now being called – it’s clear that May’s dancing skills are the least of her worries. The dance may, in fact, have backfired, because people hate having their intelligence insulted. And it will take more than a public show of awkwardness to distract people who have been suffering nearly a decade of Tory austerity.

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Featured image via YouTube

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