One town found the most epic way to handle its neo-Nazi visitors [VIDEO]

Sophia Akram

A German town found the most epic way to handle its neo-Nazi visitors, which gained renewed exposure after a tweet recalling the story went viral.

After the events in Charlottesville on 12 August, people spoke out to condemn the day’s violence. The far-right protest involving neo-Nazis resulted in one woman being killed and around 20 people injured. But neo-Nazism isn’t an American problem alone, it’s a European issue too.

That’s why author Cleve Jones provided a pithy anecdote of when neo-Nazi demonstrators visited a German town, which he posted in a tweet:

Wunsiedel’s wonderful idea

Each year neo-Nazi groups hold a memorial march in the town of Wunsiedel for Rudolf Hess, a well-known Nazi leader who was originally buried there.

While the local residents opposed the march, their previous attempts to shut it down had not worked. So in 2014 activists from Rechts gegen Rechts (Right against Right) decided to pull a prank on the marchers. They turned the march into a charity walkathon for an anti-extremism charity. And for every metre the neo-Nazis walked, local residents and businesses donated €10. In total they raised €10,000 for the opt-out initiative ‘EXIT Deutschland‘:

For the first time in history neo-Nazis are marching against themselves.

€10,000 to help right-wing extremists safely defect from the right-wing extremists scene, personally collected by right-wing extremists…

To mock the marchers even more, activists hung up posters to remind them what they were “marching for… or rather against”. And markings on the road told them how much money they had raised at various points. The activists even gave out bananas to help the marchers keep their strength up until they reached the end of the march, which is when they found out about the prank.

Ridiculous

Jones’ tweet has now gone viral because, unfortunately, the story is still relevant. And it prompted others to share more ideas on how to tackle future far-right marches. These included trolling far-right marchers by playing the tuba. Or throwing glitter on them. The idea is to ridicule them to highlight the ridiculousness of their ideas.

It is unfortunate that Nazi commemoration is still a present day phenomenon. But instead of losing hope we can take inspiration from the town of Wunsiedel until the fascist right finally becomes irrelevant.

Watch how the march unravelled here:

Get Involved!

– Donate to an anti-Extremist charity like EXIT Deutschland.

– Read more Canary articles on the far right and extremism.

Featured image via video screengrab

We need your help ...

The coronavirus pandemic is changing our world, fast. And we will do all we can to keep bringing you news and analysis throughout. But we are worried about maintaining enough income to pay our staff and minimal overheads.

Now, more than ever, we need a vibrant, independent media that holds the government to account and calls it out when it puts vested economic interests above human lives. We need a media that shows solidarity with the people most affected by the crisis – and one that can help to build a world based on collaboration and compassion.

We have been fighting against an establishment that is trying to shut us down. And like most independent media, we don’t have the deep pockets of investors to call on to bail us out.

Can you help by chipping in a few pounds each month?

The Canary Support us

Comments are closed