David Cameron milks the England victory to make a comeback. But it all goes pear-shaped.

David Cameron
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Former prime minister David Cameron attempted to milk the England victory on Tuesday 3 July to make a comeback. But it all went pear-shaped.

Penalty

England beat Colombia by a single goal in a penalty shootout. But when Cameron tried to get involved, things didn’t go quite as well for him. Because people quickly turned his football commentary against him:

Cameron’s government unleashed a relentless austerity programme that forced ordinary people to pay for the bankers’ financial crash of 2007/8. At the same time, his policies piled on more debt than every Labour government combined since World War II.

Then, as many pointed out, there’s the former Tory leader’s Brexit game-playing:

And the tax dodging of Cameron’s family:

‘Yeah, I’m a big-time fan. Totally.’

Other people reminded Cameron of the time he mixed up which football team he supports. During a 2015 general election speech, the former prime minister urged people to support West Ham. Apparently, Cameron forgot that he claims to be an Aston Villa fan:

Cameron was ridiculed intensely at the time:

“Staggering lack of self-awareness”

Back in 2018, some Twitter users were particularly unforgiving:

On social media, Cameron tried and failed to use the World Cup to make a comeback with the British people. But the former prime minister’s record has left a stain he can never wash off. And rightly so.

Get Involved!

– Check out the People’s Assembly Against Austerity.

Featured image via World Economic Forum/ WikiCommons

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