May’s response to Corbyn at the budget just blew up the internet. But not in a good way [TWEETS]

Corbyn 8 March
Steve Topple

A gif has been taking the internet by storm. And it doesn’t portray Theresa May in the most positive of lights. But it maybe sums up her attitude to the Budget.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was asking May a question over the current Surrey Council scandal. As The Canary previously reported, the government allegedly offered Surrey Conservative Council leader David Hodge extra cash to ‘kill off’ a referendum on a council tax hike. The council originally floated a 15% increase in council tax to pay for its adult social care crisis. The tax hike would’ve embarrassed both Philip Hammond and Jeremy Hunt.

Wait, what?

But May seemingly found Corbyn’s line of serious questioning rather amusing:

Social media users instantly picked up on May’s over-gesticulating:

Really?

Some people noted the rather ‘scary’ overtones of May’s laughing:

Other people, meanwhile, pondered if it was amusing, or worrying:

Some thought there were sinister forces at play:

https://twitter.com/LewisMckenzie94/status/839452758814011394

It’s not funny, May

But Corbyn’s question was regarding a very serious matter. Because it emerged yesterday that Surrey Council’s leader essentially admitted that there was a “sweetheart” deal between it and the government:

But like the Surrey debacle, May’s ‘laugh-it-off’ attitude will probably be in play for the budget itself. Which, if early indications are anything to go by, includes yet more austerity. Which is no laughing matter for the poorest in society.

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– Read more from The Canary on the Budget 2017.

Featured image via screengrab

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