Tremor measuring 2.23 on Richter scale recorded at UK fracking site

The Canary

A tremor measuring 2.23 on the Richter scale has been recorded at the UK’s only active fracking site.

Energy firm  Cuadrilla said the “micro seismic event” at their site near Blackpool was detected at 11.01pm on Saturday.

The movement was stronger than what was described as the largest-ever tremor at their  Preston New Road facility on 21 August, when a 1.55-magnitude tremor was recorded.

The company said Saturday’s tremor lasted for about one second and occurred when no fracking was taking place.

“We can confirm that a micro seismic event measuring 2.23ML (local magnitude) on the Richter scale occurred at Preston New Road,” a spokesperson said.

“This lasted for around one second and resulted in ground motion less than 1.5 mm/s. Hydraulic fracturing was not taking place at the time.”

According to the British Geological Survey, the tremor had a depth of 2km (1.2 miles) and was felt by residents in areas including Great Plumpton, Blackpool and Lytham St Annes.

Regulators were informed and the “integrity” of the well has been confirmed, Cuadrilla said.

Fracking was temporarily stopped at the site after Wednesday’s tremor. Pausing work for 18 hours is the routine response for any tremor over 0.5.

Labour’s shadow business secretary Rebecca Long Bailey has called for fracking to be banned, saying it causes air and water pollution and contributes to climate change.

Environmental campaign group Friends of the Earth said in 60 days of fracking last year there were 57 tremors in Lancashire and that it cannot be carried out without triggering earthquakes.

“Even small vibrations at ground level can be the sign of far more damaging impacts deep underground,” said Jamie Peters, a campaigner for the organisation.

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