Sadiq Khan balloon flies a mere two months after it would have been relevant

Man looking up at the Sadiq Khan balloon
Wilson Belshaw

When President Trump visited the UK, a balloon of him looking like a baby was flown over London. The joke was:

  1. President Trump is somewhat less than mature.
  2. President Trump is exactly the sort of person who would be annoyed by a balloon.

In response, critics of the original protest have created a balloon of Sadiq Khan – a mere two months later. The joke this time is… err… we’re not sure.

Heads in the clouds

Off The Perch spoke with the Khan balloon maker – one Eric Bubble:

OTP: What was the point of this ballon?

EB: Well, the people who did the first protest were saying Trump is a balloon, so now we’re saying Khan is – you know – a balloon.

OTP: They weren’t so much saying he’s a balloon as accusing him of being a wailing toddler. Are you not worried that coming back with “we know you are, but what are we?” amplifies that accusation?

EB: That’s what we’re saying – Sadiq Khan is a balloon.

OTP: Ah. I think it may have gone over your head.

EB: Obviously it went over our head; it’s a balloon.

OTP: No, I mean the joke went over your head.

EB: It’s a balloon! It’s supposed to go over your head!

OTP: Nice talking to you.

Swing and a miss

The original balloon worked because it played on Trump’s Achilles heel – which is any sort of ridicule.

If the people behind the new balloon really wanted to upset Khan, they should have come out in favour of mild, Scandinavian-style social democracy.

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Featured image via YouTube / Pexels / Michael Knapeck – Flickr [IMAGE WAS ALTERED]

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Wilson Belshaw