Johnson will defend smallest personal majority for a PM since 1924

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Boris Johnson will go into the general election on 12 December trying to defend the smallest constituency majority for a prime minister in nearly 100 years.

Johnson is seeking re-election as MP for Uxbridge & South Ruislip, it was confirmed on Thursday.

He won the seat in 2017 with a majority of just 5,034.

No prime minister since 1924 has fought a general election while simultaneously defending such a slim personal majority.

(PA Graphics)

A swing of just over 5% would be enough for Labour to take the seat from the Conservatives and leave Johnson without a constituency.

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This kind of swing, if it was repeated across the country, would see Labour on course to be the largest party in a hung parliament.

Johnson has been the MP for Uxbridge & South Ruislip since 2015.

It currently ranks at number 54 on a list of Conservative seats most vulnerable to Labour.

In 2017 there was a swing in the seat from the Tories to Labour of 6.5%.

A similar swing in 2019 would see Johnson defeated.

POLITICS Election Uxbridge
(PA Graphics)

The seat is being contested for the Labour Party by Ali Milani, who lives locally. As he told the New Statesman:

This isn’t just about unseating Boris. Yes, it would be a historic moment, and we are absolutely up for the fight. But we talk to people about the issues facing their lives – housing, the hospital, GPs, their local schools – as someone who’s their neighbour as well as their representative.

He also made this point when talking to inews:

I didn’t stand to be the Muslim standing against Boris Johnson. I stood because I am the candidate living down the road. I know the lives of people here. I’m a neighbour, not a politician

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